Past Statewide Training

2010
John Hintze, Ph.D.: Served as a senior consultant for the U.S. DOE's National Center on Response to Intervention and the National Center on Student Progress Monitoring | April 28, 2010, 8 am-3:30 pm

Curriculum–Based Measurement (CBM) is an assessment approach designed to measure the growth of student proficiency in core educational skills that are predictive of positive school success. This all-day workshop will provide an overview of CBM and discuss how to use CBM screening and progress monitoring data to make instructional decisions within a Response to Intervention (RtI) model. Steps involved in the RtI data-based decision making process will be outlined as well as procedures for establishing data-based decision making rules within a tiered intervention system.

Dr. Erica Lembke: Trainer for the National Centers on Progress Monitoring and Response to Intervention | March 24, 8 am-March 25, 2010 3:30 pm

Curriculum–Based Measurement (CBM) is an assessment approach designed to measure the growth of student proficiency in core educational skills that are predictive of positive school success. This all-day workshop will provide an overview of CBM and discuss how to use CBM screening and progress monitoring data to make instructional decisions within a Response to Intervention (RtI) model. Steps involved in the RtI data-based decision making process will be outlined as well as procedures for establishing data-based decision making rules within a tiered intervention system.

2009
Phyllis Robertson, Ph.D. - A Clinical Associate Professor at The University of Texas at Austin who has over 20 years experience exploring the relationship between culture, language and disability. | December 7, 2009, 8:30 am-3 pm

RtI models that involve English Language Learners require a comprehensive, collaborative approach in which educators have a common understanding of second language acquisition, cultural influences on teaching and learning, and effective instructional practices. This all day workshop provides a brief overview of RtI and focuses on the relevant instructional and assessment factors schools need to consider when implementing the RtI process with English Language Learners. Participants will explore the essential features of RtI models with a focus on quality core instruction to ELLs, using data to identify struggling students, factors to consider when selecting "research-based interventions," aligning interventions with linguistic and cultural characteristics, the role of the problem-solving team, and evaluating student response.

Dr. Daryl Mellard, National Center on RtI, author of RTI: A Practitioner’s Guide to Implementing Response to Intervention | October 14, 2009, 8 am-3:30 pm

Response to Intervention is a multi-tiered early detection and intervening process that identifies struggling students early and assists them before they fall behind. RtI incorporates high-quality instruction/intervention matched to student needs and frequent and regular progress monitoring. This all-day workshop, provided free of charge, provides an overview regarding the critical features and concepts of RtI followed by a set of tools school-based RtI teams can use to begin designing an RtI process. The workshop will also focus on how to establish building-level adoption or consensus for RtI. Each team will assess their school’s RtI readiness and leave with an action or implementation plan that will support preliminary RtI efforts in their school.

Karen Kemp, author of RtI: The Classroom Connection for Literacy; Tom Komp, 2008 NYS Elementary Principal of the Year | September 26, 2009, 8:30 am-3 pm

Across the country, schools are actively involved in the implementation of Response to Intervention, an early intervening process designed to identify students who may be at-risk for academic failure. The Council of Exceptional Children-Chapter 402 in collaboration with the Niagara Frontier Reading Council is pleased to host an RtI panel discussion by school-based practitioners who have extensive and practical RtI experience. The morning will begin with an overview of RtI models and processes from two New York State public schools who have been implementing RtI for several years. Panel presenters will describe their school’s RtI model, the role of school staff within the RtI process and identify critical factors to consider to ensure successful implementation. The panel discussion will conclude with an opportunity for attendees to ask questions relative to RtI to help further their own understanding of this early prevention process.

Dr. Joan Miller, Mount Saint Mary College | June 28, 2009, 8:30 am-3 pm

The Content Literacy Continuum (CLC), developed by the Center for Research on Learning at the University of Kansas, is a supportive framework that consists of five levels of increasing intensity designed to meet the needs of high, average, and low achievers at the middle school level. This presentation describes each of the five levels and how they can be incorporated into an RtI process.

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